Gnadenhutten Museum and Historic Site
Kent Historical Society Museum
Gnadenhutten Museum and Historic Site
Mansfield Memorial Museum
Gnadenhutten Museum and Historic Site
Kent Historical Society Museum
Gnadenhutten Museum and Historic Site
McCook House Civil War Museum
McCook House
Inside the McCook House Civil War Museum
   The McCook House’s original owner, Daniel McCook, moved to Carrollton in 1832 and into the house sometime in 1837, and not in 1830 as the plaque beside its main entrance erroneously reports. During the twenty-one years he and his family lived here, they had a profound impact both on the town and the county in which it stands. The McCook family become known as the “Fighting McCooks” because a large portion of two consecutive generations of its men served in the American military. The family consisted of three branches headed by brothers Daniel, John, and George. These patriarchs oversaw the “Tribe of Dan,” the “Tribe of John,” and the “Tribe of George.”
   John’s son Henry Christopher was a trained minister born in 1837. Despite being a man of the cloth, he helped to raise the 41st Regiment of Illinois Volunteers. Commissioned as a captain in Company A on August 7, 1861, he became its chaplain. His military career didn’t last long. The next year he became a minster for the Presbyterian Church in Clinton, Illinois. In 1870 he moved to Pennsylvania to take up the post of pastor of the Seventh Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia.
   A bit of a renaissance man, he not only oversaw the merger of the Sixth and Seventh Presbyterian Churches in 1873, he designed some of the architectural features for the combined congregations’ new Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. He was also a noted scientist. Over the years he penned a number of scientific papers and books including page turners such as The Natural History of the Agricultural Ant of Texas, American Spiders and Their Spinning Work, and Ant Communities and How They Are Governed: A Study in Natural Civic.
   He never abandoned his connection with the U.S. military. When the Spanish-American War broke out in 1898, he was a reserve chaplain for the Pennsylvania Volunteer’s Regiment. From this he was detached for relief work in Cuba with the National Relief Commission, an organization with the goal of bettering hospitals and improving care for the sick and wounded. In his spare time he worked to identify graves of Americans who died on the island, this venture resulting in still another book, The Martial Graves of our Fallen Heroes in Santiago de Cuba. His own grave can be found in Woodlands Cemetery in Philadelphia into which he was put after his death in Devon, Pennsylvania, on October 31. 1911.
   Another of Daniel’s sons, Edwin Stanton, survived the Civil War but didn’t avoid a violent death. Considered the family’s hothead, he was born in Carrollton in 1837 and educated at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Despite being trained as a seaman, when war broke out he decided to enter the army instead. He organized a company of men that joined the 31st Illinois Voluntary Infantry commanded by his friend Colonel John A. Logan. Badly wounded during Grant’s attack on Fort Donelson on the border of Tennessee and Kentucky, Edwin recovered and went on to take command of Logan’s regiment. He fought in several major campaigns, including Sherman’s March to the Sea. He became a brigadier general and was made a brevet major general.
   In February 1872 Edwin was appointed Secretary of the Territory of Dakota, and in April 1873 became its acting governor. On September 11 of that same year he went to the city of Yankton, the territory’s capital, to help resolve a conflict between it and the Dakota Southern Railroad Company. At a meeting in the city’s courthouse, Peter P. Wintermute proposed a resolution that expressed no confidence in the railroad and its management. This went nowhere, so he headed to the nearby St. Charles Hotel for a drink.
   Here he saw Edwin, a known ally of the Dakota Southern, and he asked the acting governor if he had a cigar, or, according to a different source, five cents to buy one. Edwin had no such sum on his person and wouldn’t give Wintermute it anyway. Wintermute already disliked Edwin because he believed the acting governor had prevented him from becoming a U.S. marshal. Wintermute said he could whip Edwin, who laughed at that. Infuriated, Wintermute spewed more threats that included shooting him. When he called Edwin a “Goddamn dirty puppy,” Edwin slapped him in the face several times, jerked him about, then pushed his face into a spittoon.