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Sauder Village

Drugged, made drunk, or tricked:  these and other techniques were used to force thousands of common merchant seaman into involuntary servitude on board ocean-going merchant sailing ships.  Called shanghaiing, this form of slavery plagued the seafaring world between 1849 and 1915.  Navies and pirates, too, compelled men to work on their ships against their will, a technique called impressment.  Shanghaiing had a particular notoriety on the Chesapeake Bay upon which oystermen went as far as Boston to snatch men for their dredgers.  Only whale ships had worse conditions:  few professional mariners willingly sailed on one of these “hell ships.”

This biography follows the life and career of one of the most colorful Marines ever to serve in the USMC. It also answers the following question: Did Butler really uncover and stop a Big Business conspiracy to overthrow President Franklin D. Roosevelt and replace him with a fascist dictator?

White River Light Station

Americans have always had a bit of an addiction to collecting souvenirs both during memorable events and tragedies. This article explores the history of this.

Zoar Village

The Battle of Lake Erie Reenactment & Put-In-Bay

Michigan Renaissance Festival

Indian Mill & Parker Covered Bridge

Fort Meigs

Fairport Harbor Museum & Harbor

Glacial Grooves

Cleveland Museum of Art and Art as History

Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

Hale Farm & Village

Ohio History Center Museum

Lyme Village: Pioneer Days

National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

President James A. Garfield House

The National Road & Zane Grey Museum

Belgium

National Museum of the Great Lakes

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and Museums

Cleveland History Center

Harpers Ferry

International Spy Museum

Liberty Aviation Museum

ARTICLES TRAVEL LOGS BOOKS

The Smithsonian

London

Malabar Farm

Mark Strecker’s Historical Perspective copyright © 2017 by Mark Strecker. Website design by Mark Strecker.

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ARTICLES

William McKinley Presidential Library & Museum

USS Cod

Hardly a romantic figure, this robber and murderer terrorized the seas and no one at the time had anything good to say about him. It took an ambitious colonial governor to do something about him.

Blackbeard Revealed

This explores the many myths about Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry and the Battle of Lake Erie, including the fact he neither held the rank of commodore nor did he win the battle because of great seamanship or strategy.

Blundering into Victory

In which we learn how the Yellow Peril (the fear that China or Japan or both would take over the West) inspired one of the most famous and successful science fiction comic strips of all times, Buck Rogers.

Buck Rogers Saves America

Henry Ford once bought his own railroad to serve the Ford Motor Company. Yet he found it a difficult venture because of the draconian Interstate Commerce Committee, which made it nearly impossible for him to make a profit.

Henry Ford’s Railroad

In the months before the U.S. Civil War ended, a desperate Confederacy decided it would end slavery in exchange for economic and military aid from Europe, an idea first proposed and later represented by Duncan Farrar Kenner.

The Last Gambit

This tells the story of one the most successful American privateers during the American Revolution, Gustavus Conyngham, who received his first commission and orders from none other than Benjamin Franklin.

Mr. Franklin’s Privateer

An article containing suggestions for family genealogists  who would like to bring a bit more life to their family histories and give more details about their ancestors.

Placing Your Family in History

Souvenir Hunting: An American Tradition

Schoenbrunn Village

AND:

Shanghaiing, the kidnapping of mariners and forcing them to sail against their will, occurred all around the world and peaked from about 1850 to 1915. No class of men could escape its grip, and U.S. laws made sailors wards of the state--legalized indentured servants!

Blood Money, Landsharks and Seamen: A Brief History of Shanghaiing

How to Avoid Being Shanghaied: Some Tips

Alpine Hills Historical Museum

Mid-American Windmill Museum